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LEGO® Millyard Project Homecoming

by Adele Maurier, SEE Design Coordinator

It felt like homecoming last weekend. Many of the talented builders who helped plan and build our LEGO® Millyard Project returned to the area for BrickFair NE. There was much reminiscing about the challenges and opportunities that arose during the Millyard construction. Other LEGO® enthusiasts from around the region were amazed by the scale and effort that went into the project. It was a treat to see what new projects our Millyard volunteers have undertaken. New England LEGO® Users Group (NELUG) members displayed cityscapes, mosaics, crazy contraptions and more

In particular, it was fun to see what Millyard volunteer, Jamie Berard is up to. If you don’t know his story, it is legendary in the LEGO® community: he started out like every LEGO® enthusiast, but then he was recruited to join the LEGO® Company! He designs sets (including some of the most spectacular expert sets) at the company’s headquarters in Denmark. He made this transition during the construction of our Millyard, but still wanting to contribute to our project, he designed and built a model of the old wooden roller coaster at Manchester’s Pine Island Park, in Denmark. It was flown here from Denmark with Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, Owner/President of the LEGO® Company for the dedication ceremony for the LEGO® Millyard Project. The dedication was an historic event for our center and the LEGO® Company and the LEGO® community.

This past weekend, Jamie shared the development process that went into his latest kit: The LEGO® Creator Fairground Mixer VIP kit. It was very interesting to learn about the iterations and time that goes into the process. You can check out some videos featuring Jamie on YouTube. Like this one about the Sydney Opera House set.

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Earth Day Fair – Continue to Explore at SEE

by Adele Maurier Design Coordinator

It was great getting out to the Stonyfield Earth Day Fair and 5K race this past weekend. We enjoyed the spring weather and meeting people from long-time members to newbies. It was fun to bring an example of our Family Workshop activities out to our booth. We made earth sun catchers based on satellite data images of the earth

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The images we used for the activity are examples of what you can explore on the Personal Planet exhibit at SEE. The Personal Planet can display real time global weather data, and earth science on a realistic spherical display controlled by an iPad. The device can also display images of other planets and video presentations. The personal planet is a product of iGlobe Inc. headquartered in the Lakes Region of NH. The PersonalPlanet is patent pending optical lens that mounts on an iMac that creates a highly accurate spherical display. It was nominated for NH product of the year in 2011.

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SEE’s Family Workshop is a program that we offer free with admission that allows visitors to work together on a science activity. The program is held in classroom space at SEE on weekends (Saturdays 11am -12pm and Sundays 2pm -3pm)   This May join us for activities on Paper Colors and light.

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May 10 & 11: Surprise Spinner
Find out what happens when your eyes try to see red blue and green colors together as they spin.

May 17& 18: Catch the Birdie
Try and capture the bird inside the cage!

May 24 & 25: Floating Flower
See what happens when paper absorbs water and expands to reveal a secret inside. 

Science Spot Light: Marine Bird Observer

Originally posted on NOAA Teacher at Sea Blog:
NOAA Teacher at Sea Kim Gogan Aboard Name of Ship: NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter Date Range at Sea; April 7th – May 1st Mission:AMAPPS & Turtle Abundance Survey,  Ecosystem Monitoring Geographical area of cruise:  North Atlantic Ocean Date: Wednesday, April 9th Weather Data from the Bridge Air Temp:   10.5…

Does vitamin C really prevent the common cold?

seesciencecenter:

This is a an interesting read. Do you believe that vitamin C can cure the common cold?

Originally posted on The Weekly Show:

Gluten-free. Low carbs. Vitamin supplements. While some of these habits have demonstrable benefits, some seem a little…weird. For instance, what would you say if I told you eating fifty-one bananas a day was the key to healthy living? Many people swear by obscure diets and practices without researching what they actually do. Let’s examine a common one: vitamin C’s ability to cure the common cold.

In 1970 famed chemist Linus Pauling published Vitamin C and the Common Cold, the culmination of his studies on vitamin C. Pauling advocated high intake of the vitamin to prevent the common cold, and in the following years championed oral and intravenous doses to increase the longevity of terminally ill cancer patients. According to his trials, vitamin C intake extended the patients’ survival as much as four times.

Vitamin C Common Cold Health Myth Weekly Show Pills Supplements Oranges Citrus

Pauling’s claims have been widely rebuked by the medical community.

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Kimberly Gogan: A Ship Full of Science! April 9, 2014

seesciencecenter:

NOAA Teacher at Sea, Kim Gogan (science teacher from Newport,NH) currently aboard the NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter just posted a blog on the progress of AMAPPS & Turtle Abundance Survey. Check it out.

Originally posted on NOAA Teacher at Sea Blog:

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Kim Gogan
Aboard NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter
April 7 – May 1, 2014

MissionAMAPPS & Turtle Abundance Survey Ecosystem Monitoring
Geographical area of cruise:  North Atlantic Ocean
Date: Wednesday, April 9th

Weather Data from the Bridge
Air Temp: 5.5 Degrees Celsius
Wind Speed: 9.0 Knots
Water Temp: 4.6 Degrees Celsius
ater Depth: 41.2 Meters

The Science Teams (Photo Credit to Mark Weekley)

The Science Teams – Photo by Mark Weekly

Science and Technology Log

If Science at Sea is what I wanted, this is the ship for it!  The evening of our departure from Newport, R.I. on Monday, April 7th, the group of scientists met in the staff lounge for a meeting of the minds. I soon found out that there was an array of scientist on the ship all with different goals and science they wanted to conduct. On this ship we have two teams of Oceanographers, a day team…

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Does influenza have an Achilles’ heel?

seesciencecenter:

Check this out.

Originally posted on THE OUTBREAK:

Flu epidemics cause up to half a million deaths worldwide each year , and emerging strains continually threaten to spread to humans and cause even deadlier pandemics. A study published by Cell Press on April 10 in the journal Immunity reveals that a drug that inhibits a molecule called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases survival rates in mice infected with a lethal dose of the H1N1 flu virus . The findings pave the way for an urgently needed therapy that is highly effective against the flu virus and potentially other viral infections.

“Drugs that specifically target PGE2 pathways have already been developed and tested in animals, so our results have excellent potential for clinical translation, not only for the treatment of influenza, but also other viral respiratory infections that interact with similar host immune pathways,” says senior study author Maziar Divangahi of McGill University.

Despite the worldwide use of vaccination…

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Silent Killers Of Your Metabolism

A great metabolism is so important to our health. Check out this list of factors that affect our metabolism.

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